Rain, Rain, Come Today!

August 11, 2011 at 7:37 PM (climate studies, curious research, current news, social opinion)


Bring the rain, please!  It has NOT rained significantly within The State of Texas for months!  The effects of the lack of precipitation are showing, especially through the appearances of parched land surfaces and sudden wildfires.  Where is the rain?

The currently dehydrated situation within Texas has made a disparagingly significant effect.  As the state is suffering through it’s third-driest recorded period, water sources are drying, farmland is withering, and animals are suffering.  The excessively dry land has the state on alert for the chance of sudden wildfires sparking!

It is being reported that Texas is suffering though it’s worst drought since 1951.  This was the climax period of a six-year-long dry period that took The Lone Star State through arid and desiccated conditions that began in 1949, and ended during 1955.  Yet, some climatic surveyors are saying that Texas still is not as parched as it was during 1956!

The metropolitan area of Houston, Texas has received only 1.5 inches of rain during the past three-month period.  This is a mere fifteen percent of what is supposed to be the normal amount of rainfall.  This measurement is being recorded as less rain that occurs within The Sahara Desert within the same time period!

Texas is not alone in it’s suffering through times without rain.  Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are other states that have had to endure drought conditions.  The National Weather Service has placed red flag warnings for each of these states, meaning that wildfires can erupt at anytime because of the arid land settings.

The conditions of La Niña are being labeled as the culprit for the current drought.  It is being speculated that the coolings of waters within The Pacific Ocean that are along the equatorial region are catalystic to the reduction of weather conditions necessary to produce needed rainfall.  As a mere 0.18 inches of rainfall have occurred within Texas during this drought period, the effects of La Niña are being eyed strongly as the major source behind this dry season.

Some meteorologists are speculating that La Niña is not the reason behind the current drought.  The effects of the weather phenomenon have occurred within the recent past, and have not produced the extremely arid effects that are happening, at this time.  Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, a climatologist from Texas A&M University has stated that La Niña will produce a fifty-fifty chance of being the cause of extreme drought within Texas.

The state’s drought settings are believed to have begun during June.  Texas’ most recently extreme levels of rain came during Tropical Storm Hermine, which brought heavy rainfall to the state during September 2010.  Since that point, Texas has fallen into it’s second-driest time since 1967.  Any continued absence of precipitation is expected to influence an extremely heavy season of wildfires, exceptionally dehydrated land, and withered vegetation.

SEE THESE SITES!!!

http://meteorologicalmusings.blogspot.com/2011/08/la-nina-more-drought-in-texas.html

http://www.yourhoustonnews.com/west_university/news/article_64581bf8-c8b2-5fcc-9609-36951d5eecf6.html

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/7330820.html

http://www.kvue.com/community/blogs/marks-weather-blog/Texas-Drought-Now-Third-Worst-on-Record-123593749.html

http://www.thegrower.com/news/Current-Texas-drought-third-driest-on-record-123383843.html

http://climatology.tamu.edu

http://www.lcra.org/droughtupdate

  Animated cactus in  the desert sun

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